Submissions

Authors, publishers, agents, publicists, tour guides, et al. :


Not taking any queries at the moment, thank you

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I  review the following literary fiction: 
  • Mystery, Thriller, and Suspense 
  • Psychological / Horror
  • Crime / Legal
  • Young Adult
  • Contemporary  ( some pre-World War II )

Do contact me via email with the following information:
 
In your email, please include: 
  • Title of the book
  • Author or pen name on the book
  • Publisher
  • Genre / category
  • Approximate word / page count
  • Cover image to use in the review and if you would like, an image of the author
  • Author photographer
  • Jacket designer
  • A small teaser about your book
  • Link to buy the book
  • Link(s) to the author's website / blog
  • The authors' Twitter username / Facebook profile page
  • Any links you think I might find helpful
  • Where you found my site - so I may give a plug to the resource on the bottom of your review
  • Would you be interested in a Q&A?

Thank you

Please:
  • Do not send me any part of your book, in file or in the email text itself.  I will contact you by reply if I am interested and/or have time to review your book based on the email information I requested.  If I am not interested, I will let you know and post your novel on my Not Reviewed page.  Please do not be discouraged by a rejection, and feel free to query again with future projects.  Not every book is going to appeal to every reader or every reviewer.
  • Do not give me an affiliate link for your book purchase.
  • Do not apply for a review if you do not want a brutally honest / unbiased review.  I post what I truly think of the content.
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Most of the books I read come from the library, but, sure, I get contacted by people who would like for me to review a book.  What I'm saying here is: I do promise I review all books honestly ~ regardless of whether they are given to me by an author, a publishing house, purchased at a local bookstore, checked out at the library, or politely quibbled over at a yard-sale.  I'll tell you what I think of the tale.


To find other book reviewers, I'd say these sites here have a couple in their pocket for sure:

The IndieView

Catering to indie authors, The IndieView features reviews of new self-published ebooks in a variety of genres, written by close to 350 reviewers from all over the world (and the Internet).  This book blog allows already reviewed authors to set up a personal author page, which is listed on the Indie Review website, and they even offer free book promotion for newly published ebook authors.

The Book Designer

This hugely popular book blog, written by Joel Friedlander—who's worked in the publishing and design industries—strives to help people get their story out there.  The Book Designer features more than 1,550 articles on everything from writing and editing to publishing and marketing your work, all from the perspectives of people who are actually in the book industry.

Bustle Books

The book section of Bustle provides everything you want to see, know, or read in the world of books.  The blog updates often—as much as 14 or 15 times a day—while maintaining a high quality of posts and covering a wide range of topics, including entertaining lists, reviews of new releases, and tips for finding writing inspiration.

Omnivoracious

Great blog name aside, Omnivoracious is Amazon's official (and must-read) book review blog.  With a minimalist and eye-catching design that focuses on books, author interviews, and industry news, this is one book blog that keeps its readers up to date on all aspects of the publishing world.  Unlike other, genre-specific blogs, Omnivoracious reviews titles ranging from kids' books and comics to lifestyle and suspense—and everything in between.

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Disclaimer:  Should I accept your book for review, you will be asked for a copy of your novel and sent to me in either .mobi, .epub or .pdf  format in exchange for my honest and unbiased review.
Files are not shared with any third parties without the express permission from the author or publisher.  I am adamant to the point I am harder than granite on that issue.
Accordingly, I will not make copies of content, or otherwise publish, disseminate or disclose any content until I post my review, all in respect to each author's intellectual property rights and confidentiality. 
I will not disclose any twist the author worked so damn hard for, nor, the ending.
I will not read partially through a book nor skim past the boring parts to the end; the whole book was written for a reason and all parts are important.
I am also not obligated to give any book, publishing house, or author a positive review in return for any materials I receive.   If I enjoy a book, I will reflect a review on that enjoyment; if I dislike a book, I will echo that aversion.
If you would appreciate a review, my blog is strictly my opinion on the author's use of his/her craft of displaying their imagination in words to tell a tale.
I will try to post my review within 4 weeks after my confirmation to you.
Authors and publishers, editors, agents, et al. may use parts of my review for quotations.



Due to a FTC ruling I am required to let my readers know when I am reviewing a book for a publisher or author.  In accordance with the new FTC Guidelines for blogging and endorsements, you should assume that every book reviewed here at Buttonholed™ Book Reviews was provided to me by the publisher, media group or the author for free and no financial payments were received, unless specified otherwise.  In the event that I am reviewing a free review copy, it will be noted above the book review with the words "This book was provided by the publisher (or author) in exchange for my honest review." 


I am not compensated in any form to provide opinion on books given for review.  The views and opinions expressed on this blog are purely mine.  Any product claim, statistic, quote or other representation about a product or service, if any I mention in my review, should be verified with the manufacturer, provider, by the publisher or author, or party in question.  My blog does not contain any content which might present a conflict of interest.
If you would like your own disclosure policy go to: http://www.disclosurepolicy.org/


Everyone  ~  Do enjoy, peace ~


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Posting My Reviews On ~


Goodreads
Twitter
The IndieView


Amazon
~  and  ~

Booksellers

I do throw recommendations on
 
BookBub




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5 comments:

  1. STATISTICAL PROPHECY PROOF OF JESUS COMPARED TO OTHERS

    Many specific prophecies about Jesus have been reviewed. We know that the Old Testament manuscripts were made before the time of Jesus. Likewise the New Testament manuscripts, widely circulated during the time of Jesus, provide evidence that the fulfillment of prophecies was accurate.

    So the essential question is, what does this mean? Are the prophecies statistically reliable enough to draw conclusions about Jesus and his claims? To answer these questions, let’s start with an estimate of only 30 of the prophecies about Jesus.

    Messianic Prophecy A “Guesstimate” of Odds

    1. Shem an ancestor (Genesis 9-10) 1/3
    2. Abraham an ancestor (Genesis 22:18) 1/1000
    3. Isaac an ancestor (Genesis 26:4) 1/10,000
    4. Jacob an ancestor (Genesis 28:14) 1/100,000
    5. Judah an ancestor (Genesis 49:10) 1/1,000,000
    6. Jesse an ancestor (Isaiah 11:1-5) 1/10,000,000
    7. King David an ancestor (2 Samuel 7:11-16) 1/100,000,000
    8. Bethlehem Ephrathah as birthplace (Micah 5:2) 1/100,000
    9. Star connected with birth (Numbers 24:17) 1/100,000
    10. Called “God with us” (Isaiah 7:14) 1/100,000
    11. Calming the sea (Psalm 107:29) 1/10,000,000
    12. “Special” miracles (Isaiah 35:4-6) 1/100,000,000
    13. Names given (Isaiah 9:6) 1/10,000
    14. Use of parable (Psalm 78:2) 1/10
    15. Ultimate king over all (Isaiah 45:23; Psalm 22) 1/10
    16. Sin offering and Passover Lamb (Isaiah 53) 1/100
    17. Will die with “wicked men” (Isaiah 53:3-9) 1/10
    18. Will be buried with a rich man (Isaiah 53:3-9) 1/10
    19. Timing of entry into Jerusalem (Daniel 9:20-27) 1/10,000,000
    20. Entering Jerusalem as a king on a donkey (Zechariah 9:9) 1/100
    21. Betrayed by a friend for 30 pieces of silver (Zech. 11:12-13) 1/1000
    22. Rejection by Israel; will say nothing at his trial (Isaiah 8:10; 53) 1/10,000
    23. Hands and feet pierced (Psalm 22) 1/10,000
    24. Identifying the place of crucifixion (Genesis 22) 1/1,000,000
    25. Will thirst while being put to death (Psalm 69:20-22) 1/10
    26. No bones broken (Psalm 22) 1/10
    27. Identification of words at the beginning and end of
    execution (Psalm 22) 1/1000
    28. Lots cast for clothing (Psalm 22) 1/1000
    29. Will be given gall and wine (Psalm 69:20-22) 1/10
    30. Will be “pierced” (Isaiah 3:5; Zechariah 12:10) 1/100

    The cumulative probability of all these prophecies randomly coming true in one person would be 1 chance in 10 exp110. This would be like winning about 16 lotteries in a row. Even if a skeptic were to substantially reduce some of the above estimates, the result would still be deemed impossible. For example, let’s very conservatively assume the above estimates are off by a factor of a trillion trillion! This would still result in the “impossible odds” of all prophecies coming true in one man, Jesus, of one chance in 10 exp86 ! How remote are these odds? They would still be like taking all of the matter in the entire universe (that is, one billion billion stars and solar systems) and breaking it all down into subatomic particles, and randomly selecting one marked electron! Truly the prophecies made about Jesus in the Old Testament alone verify his divinity because they verify the Bible’s claims about him, and his claims about himself.

    Prophecies Made by Jesus Himself

    Old Testament prophecies provide powerful evidence about Jesus. However, there is also evidence that Jesus himself is a divine prophet. Although he prophesied many things, by far the most significant were his multiple prophecies that he would be betrayed, crucified, and on the third rise from the dead:

    Now as Jesus was going up to Jerusalem, he took the twelve disciples aside and said to them,
    “we are going up to Jerusalem, and the Son of Man will be betrayed to the chief priests and
    the teachers of the law. They will condemn him to death and will turn him over to the
    gentiles to be mocked and flogged and crucified. On the third day he will be raised to life!”
    (Matthew 20:17-19).

    ReplyDelete
  2. Jesus prophesied his death and resurrection numerous times, in all four Gospels:
    • Matthew 12:40;16:21; 17:22-23; 20:17-19; 26:61; 27:40; 27:63
    • Mark 8:31; 9:30-32; 10:32-34; 14:58; 14:58; 15:29-30
    • Luke 9:21-22,44-45; 18:31-34
    • John 2:13-22; 3:14-16; 12:32-34

    If there was ever an unusual and amazing prophecy, it would be one with the specific details of the prophesier’s death, and far more, that he would rise from the dead in three day! Out of all kinds of prophecy, this one is phenomenal and would be beyond any odds imaginable!

    So central was this prophecy to Jesus’ life that he stated it many times; it was recorded in the Gospel accounts in 18 places! It is a prediction that only an all-knowing God could make and fulfill.

    In addition to this, Jesus also prophesied specifically about other things as well:
    • One of his disciples would betray him (Matthew 26:21; Mark 14:17-21; Luke 22:21-22)
    • His disciples would desert him (Matthew 26:30-31; Mark 14:26-27).
    • Peter would disown him three times (Matthew 26:33-34; Mark 14:29-30; Luke 22:31-34).
    • He would meet the disciples in Galilee after he had risen (Mark 14:28).

    Other People Believed That Jesus Was God

    An obvious question is, with all the prophetic evidence, did the Jews of the day, who certainly would be aware of the prophecies in the Tanakh, think that Jesus was God? In fact, the Jews in Jerusalem were very rapidly accepting reported that the number who immediately believed in the resurrection (presumably the eyewitnesses) was at least 120 (Acts 1:15) before the Feast of Pentecost, which was 50 days after the resurrection. (It could have been more since this verse refers only to believers present at that setting.) When Peter spoke on the Day of Pentecost, immediately 3000 men were added to the group of believers (Acts 2:41). Why was Peter’s message so compelling? Because it was based on the prophecies the Jews knew and the events they had witnessed or had heard about. The Bible further reports that the number increased daily (2:47).

    One of the most striking indications of the early belief that Jesus was God in the Gospel of John. John himself was an eyewitness to all the events of Jesus’ life, and his account was both written and circulated during the lifetime of other eyewitnesses:

    In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was with
    God in the beginning. Through him all things were made; without him nothing was made that has
    been made. In him was life, and that life was the light of men. The light shines in the darkness,
    but the darkness has not understood it.

    There came a man who was sent from God; his name was John. [This is speaking of John the Bap-
    tist.] He came as a witness to testify concerning that light, so that through him all men might
    believe. He himself was not the light; he came only as a witness to the light. The true light that
    gives light to every man was coming into the world.

    He was in the world, and through the world was made through him, the world did not recognize
    him. He came to that which was his own, but his own did not receive him. Yet to all who received
    him, to those who believed in his name, he gave the right to become children of God, children born
    not of natural descent, nor of human decision or a husband’s will, but born of God.

    The Word became flesh and made his dwelling among us. We have seen his glory, the glory of the
    One and Only, who came from the Father, full of grace and truth (John 1:1-14).

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  3. John’s words clearly show that he believed that Jesus was God. And others who were close to him also believed that he was God.

    • Peter worshiped him (Luke 5:8). A Jew would worship no one other than God.
    • Likewise, Thomas worshiped him (John 20:28).
    • Peter, James and John witnessed and reported the “transfiguration” (Matthew 17), a visible demonstration that Jesus Possessed the same glory as God the Father.
    • Elizabeth, Jesus’ relative, believed that he was God (Luke 1:41-55).
    • Simeon, a devout Jewish prophet, believed that Jesus was God (Luke 2:25-35).
    • Anna, a prophetess, believed he was God (Luke 2:36-38).
    • Even Jesus’ half brothers James and Jude eventually believed that Jesus was God (see the books of James and Jude).
    • A Roman centurion and others who were at the crucifixion believed Jesus to be God:

    At that moment the curtain of the temple was torn in two from top to bottom. The earth
    shook and the rocks split. The tombs broke open and the bodies of many holy people
    who had died were raised to life. They came out of the tombs, and after Jesus’ resurrec-
    tion they went into the holy city and appeared to many people.

    When the centurion and those with him who were guarding Jesus saw the earthquake and
    all that had happened, they were terrified, and exclaimed, “Surely he was the Son of God!”
    (Matthew 27:51-54).

    The high priest and others at Jesus’ trial believed that Jesus was claiming to be God incarnate:

    The high priest said to him, “I charge you under oath by the living God. Tell us if you are
    the Christ, the Son of God.”
    “Yes, it is as you say,” Jesus replied. “But I say to all of you: In the future you will see the Son
    of Man sitting at the right hand of the Mighty One and coming on the clouds of heaven.” Then
    the high priest tore his clothes and said, “He has spoken blasphemy! Why do we need any more
    witnesses? Look, now you have heard the blasphemy” (Matthew 26:63-65).


    Not only did the high priest officially declare that Jesus had blasphemed, but his tearing of clothes was a
    sign of mourning and revulsion over blasphemy.


    Other Holy Books Fail the Prophecy Test

    Given that prophecy is a true test of something from God it is not surprising that very few holy books attempt any prophecy. After all, since only God can prophesy, and we would expect that most supposed
    “holy books” are not really from God, it would be difficult to concoct testable prophecy that would be
    verifiable (like the Bible).

    Considering other well-known religions, we find the following:

    Eastern religions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucius, Shinto). These religions are essentially “mystical,
    philosophical” religions and therefore tend not to use or depend on prophecy.

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  4. Islam (and the Qur’an). Although Islam is history-based and agrees with many of the same historical figures mentioned in the Bible (Abraham, Ishmael, Jesus, Mary, and so on), it cannot prove its inspiration from God using prophecy. The Qur’an was written based on dictation by Muhammad (570-632 A.D.).

    Sura 9:14; Sura 28:85; Sura 48:16-21,27,28; Sura 54:44-48; and Sura 56:1-56 all deal with end time prophecy that was excluded). Sura 5:70; 15:9; 41:42; and 15:96 are not prophecies, but generalities and warnings. Sura 24:55 is a promise of blessing of land and wealth to believers is Islam. However it does not specify what land, as in the case of Israel. Sura 54:44-48 prophesies military action against enemies of the religion, but this doesn’t say much, as it is what people tend to do anyway. And Sura 110:1-2 promises help from Allah (Islam’s God) in time of war. Again, this isn’t specific, for instance, a claim to victory in a specific battle or war.

    Sura 30:2-4 is the only potential historical prophecy, although it has problems. It essentially says that, “The Roman Empire has been defeated in a land close by; but they, (even) after (this) defeat of theirs, will soon be victorious with a few years. With Allah is the Decision, in the past and in the Future: on that Day shall the Believers rejoice.” In history, the Persians were victorious over the Eastern Roman Empire in A.D. 615,
    and then the Romans returned to defeat the Persians 13 years later in 628. According to Muhammad, “a few” years in this prophecy was meant to mean 3 to 9 years, with 13 falling outside of this range. Even so,
    the prophecy would not be particularly surprising since there was an ongoing war in this region, and it was
    not uncommon for territory to be recaptured.

    Mormons (the Book of Mormon, Doctrines and Covenants). The Book of Mormon was actually written in the early 1800s, supposedly translated from golden plates written before the time of Jesus (unfortunately,
    these valuable plates have never been available for verification). Even so, giving the plates the benefit of
    the doubt, the Book of Mormon contains two prophecies about Jesus, both of which are false:

    And behold, he shall be born of Mary, at Jerusalem which is the land of our forefathers, she
    being a virgin, a precious and chosen vessel, who shall be overshadowed and conceive by the
    power of the Holy Ghost, and bring forth a son, yes even the Son of God (Alma 7:10, Book of
    Mormon).

    Of course Jesus was born in Bethlehem, not Jerusalem. Some may claim that Bethlehem is a suburb of
    Jerusalem; however, when transportation was by foot, a town an hour and a half away would not be considered a suburb. Even the Book Mormon indicates it is a separate city (1 Nephi 1:4). Here’s
    another example:

    But behold, thus saith the Lord God: “When the day cometh that they (the Jews) shall believe
    in me, that I am Christ, then have I covenanted with their fathers that they shall be restored in
    the flesh, upon the earth unto the lands of their inheritance” (2 Nephi 10:7, Book of Mormon).

    Of course the Jews did return to the land in 1948 despite not yet “believing” in Jesus.
    The Mormon book of Doctrine and Covenants contains several prophetic errors (with none right, in fact)
    regarding a Temple that was to be built in western Missouri within a generation of Joseph Smith’s prediction in the early 1800s: 1) A temple was to be built at a consecrated site in Jackson County, Missouri (“Zion”), within a generation of 1832 (Doctrines and Covenants 84:5,31). 2) The city (“Zion”) was
    “never to be moved” out of that place (98:19; 101:17-21). Over 150 years have passed with no temple built there.

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  5. The Jehovah’s Witnesses (The Watchtower, Studies in Scripture). This non-Christian group has repeatedly failed in attempts to prophesy the end of time.

    • (2:101) – 1914 to be the year of the “battle” of the great day of God Almighty (Revelation 16:14)
    • (1914 edition) – “end of the world” date changed to 1915
    • (7:62) – date changed to 1918
    • (7:542) – date changed to 1920
    • (Miscellaneous other publications) – date of the end of the world repeatedly changed to 1925, 1942,
    1975, 1980…

    With continuing research, one would find that there is no religion, person, or holy book that contains prophecy of any substance whatsoever, and certainly nothing close to the prophecy in the Bible. This would lead one to carefully heed the words of the Bible as truth.

    ReplyDelete